Debates in Transnationalism: May 2015

2015 Call for Papers

Northeast Modern Language Association
46th Annual Convention

Toronto, Ontario

April 30-May 3, 2015

The 46th Annual Convention will feature approximately 350 sessions, as well as dynamic speakers and cultural events. Interested participants may submit abstracts to more than one NeMLA session; however, panelists can only present one paper (panel or seminar). Convention participants may present a paper at a panel and also present at a creative session or participate in a roundtable.

Transnational Utopian Literature: Influences on the U.S. into the 21st Century

America was viewed in the eighteenth and nineteenth century as a land of opportunity. Thinkers such as Edward Bellamy, Robert Owens, Charles Fourier and others utilized the vast American territory as an experimental testing ground for their proposed theories. What influences do the utopian theorists have on ecology, environmentalism, technology, and/or corporate hegemony in the twenty-first century as depicted in print or on stage?

Chair: Annette M Magid

 

Oceanic Turns: The Politics of Hemispheric American Studies

This roundtable examines the locations, terminologies, and methodologies that shape the oceanic turn in contemporary American literary studies. Taking the Pacific and Atlantic oceans as our loci, we are seeking papers that address the material conditions, literary constructs, and social imaginaries that function as oceanic spaces in literary and historical discourses. Scholars working on Atlantic, Black Atlantic, transnational, or hemispheric studies are invited to submit abstracts.

Chairs: Laurie Lambert, Bridget McFarland

Questioning Boundaries: New Applications of Black Transnationalism

Beginning with Paul Gilroy’s The Black Atlantic in 1993, the study of black transnationalism has proven fruitful in exhibiting the extent to which transatlantic and global concepts continue to factor into black identity. This panel seeks papers that utilize the lens of black transnationalism to illuminate and enhance our understanding of literary texts or cultural movements. Possible paper topics might include, but are not limited to: migration and alienation; identity construction; national boundaries; space and spatiality; black Canada.

Chair: Joshua Murray

 

Changing Forms, Changing Genres

This panel investigates the transmutation of literary genres in twentieth-century British/Anglophone fiction. How does a specific genre or a fictional form reveal its representational limits in colonial, postcolonial, or transnational contexts? How does the transmuted form represent or fail to represent new social relations and the tension between hegemonic and resistant forces? Possible topics include: realist fiction, the Bildungsroman, the romance novel, and the estate novel. Send 300-words abstracts to Minjeong Kim.

Chair: Minjeong Kim

 

Romantic and Victorian Echoes: A Transatlantic Exchange

This panel applies a transnational approach, which is interested in links between British Romantic and Victorian authors with American writers such as (but not limited to) William Wordsworth and Ralph Waldo Emerson, Elizabeth Barrett Browning and Margaret Fuller, Elizabeth Barrett Browning and Emily Dickinson, Alfred Lord Tennyson and Walt Whitman, Thomas Carlyle and Ralph Waldo Emerson, William Wordsworth and Henry David Thoreau, etc. Papers will focus on how British writers influenced the form, content, and sensibility of American writers.

Chair: Dewey Hall

Hip-Hop: Interrogating Identity, Authenticity, and Transnationalism

As hip-hop has become a transnational and multicultural phenomenon, one must stop to ponder the aspect of authenticity within the movement. This panel seeks to examine the ways in which hip-hop has evolved within each of its cultural manifestations, and navigate the politics of authenticity within each (socio)cultural/political realization. This roundtable seeks to discover the cultural, rhetorical, and socio-political realizations of Canadian hip-hop as they relate to its American counterparts in form, style, and modes of dissemination.

Chair: Judah-Micah Lamar

Urban Protest: Global Migrants and the Public Sphere

This panel will examine the rhetorical strategies and esthetics of protest movements that draw attention to the situation of global migrants. What counter-narratives do transnational migrants create against newly mainstreamed discourses of exclusion and invisibility? How do gendered migrant bodies stage their reduction to bare life in ‘willfull’ urban protest actions? (Agamben 1998; Ahmed 2011). How might performance art, film, or fiction act to politicize its spectators (Rancière 2009)?

Chair: Helga Druxes

New Work in Transnational North American Book History: Canada, U. S., Mexico

This panel will take a hemispheric approach to new research in the transnational North American history of the book. Papers are welcome that explore the movements of texts, authors, printers, and publishers across the Canada-United States-Mexico borders and borderlands, and how this movement affects our understanding of the creation, production, distribution, consumption, reading, and reception of material texts and textualities, from the colonial period to the present. Submit 300-word proposals to Jeffrey Makala.

Chair: Jeffrey Makala

Women’s and Gender Studies Women’s War Images: Through the Female Gaze This transnational panel will examine women’s visual narratives of the wars of the twentieth century, seeking to uncover how women depicted themselves and their work beyond the public images that shaped women’s traditional wartime roles. How did female artists, women on active service, women in occupied zones, and women who worked at home visually depict the war and their roles in it in artwork, albums, and illustrated texts? Do such depictions contradict or reinforce traditional gender roles? Interdisciplinary Humanities Andrea McKenzie

Women’s War Images: Through the Female Gaze

This transnational panel will examine women’s visual narratives of the wars of the twentieth century, seeking to uncover how women depicted themselves and their work beyond the public images that shaped women’s traditional wartime roles. How did female artists, women on active service, women in occupied zones, and women who worked at home visually depict the war and their roles in it in artwork, albums, and illustrated texts? Do such depictions contradict or reinforce traditional gender roles?

Chair: Andrea McKenzie

Area: Women’s and Gender Studies

 

https://nemla.org/convention/2015/cfp.html

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s